Prepper Living on Facebook

April 17th, 2014 No comments

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Prepper Myth#1: Golden Hordes and Cities Burning to the Ground

March 21st, 2014 No comments

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299 Days: The Preparation

March 20th, 2014 No comments

Meet Grant Matson: lawyer, father, suburbanite husband who awakens to the fragility of modern society and embarks on a personal journey that introduces him to a world of self-reliance and liberation.

299 Days: The Preparation, the first book in the 299 Days series, depicts the inner struggles Grant must face as he exists in a social system he recognizes as unsustainable and on the verge of collapse, but one in which he has built his life around. What begins as a return to his roots, self-sufficiency and independence, becomes a full blown move to prepare for what may come. Engaging, insightful and a bit suspenseful, follow Grant’s transition from a self-perceived “sheeple” to a full-blown “prepper.” Will his fears come true? Is he an extremist? What if nothing happens? What if something does?

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Itunes test #2

March 17th, 2014 No comments

Still getting iTunes to work for us.

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Old notes

March 17th, 2014 No comments

 

You needed

371.25 grains of pure silver or 24.75 grains

of pure gold to mint one dollar.

 

1.603773 Gold Grams

 

24.053356 Silver Grams

 

 

That  the proportional value of gold and silver in all coins which shall by law be current as money within the United States, shall be fifteen to one, according to quantity in weight, of pure gold or pure silver; that is to say, every fifteen pounds weight of pure silver shall be of equal value in all payments, with one pound weight of pure gold, and so in proportion as to any greater or less quantities of the respective metals.

 

which fixed the dollar at .7734 troy ounces of silver

 

 

Species of the coins to be struck.

Section 9. And be it further enacted, That there shall be from time to time struck and coined at the said mint, coins of gold, silver, and copper, of the following denominations, values and descriptions, viz.

 

 

 

EAGLES–each to be of the value of ten dollars or units, and to contain two hundred and forty-seven grains and four eighths of a  grain of pure, or two hundred and seventy grains of standard gold.

 

247.5 =16.037731 grams   0.515625 tr oz

 

 

HALF EAGLES–each to be of the value of five  dollars, and to contain one hundred and twenty-three grains and six eighths of a grain of pure, or one hundred and thirty-five grains of standard gold.

 

123.75=8.018865 grams 0.257813 tr oz

 

 

 

QUARTER EAGLES–each to be of the value of two dollars and a half dollar, and to contain sixty-one grains and seven eighths of a grain of pure, or sixty-seven grains and four eighths of a grain of standard gold.

 

61. 875=4.009433 grams 0.128906 tr oz

 

 

DOLLARS OR UNITS–each to be of the value of a Spanish milled dollar as the same is now current, and to contain three hundred and seventy-one grains and four sixteenth parts  of a grain of pure, or four hundred and sixteen grains of standard silver.

 

371.25=24.056596 grams 0.773438 tr oz

 

 

HALF DOLLARS–each to be of half the value of the dollar or unit, and to contain one   hundred and eighty-five grains and ten sixteenth parts of a grain of pure, or two hundred and eight grains of standard silver.

 

185.625=12.028298 grams 0.386719 tr oz

 

 

 

QUARTER DOLLAR–each to be of one fourth the value of the dollar or unit, and to contain ninety-two grains and thirteen sixteenth parts of a grain of pure, or one hundred and four grains of standard silver.

 

92.8125=6.014149 grams 0.193359 tr oz

 

 

 

DISMES–each to be of the value of one tenth of a dollar or unit, and to contain thirty- seven grains and two sixteenth parts of a grain of pure, or forty-one grains and three fifths parts of a grain of standard silver.

 

37.125=2.40566 grams 0.077344 tr oz

 

 

HALF DISMES–each to be of the value of one twentieth of a dollar, and to contain eighteen grains and nine sixteenth parts of a grain of pure, or twenty grains and four fifths parts of a grain of standard silver.

 

18.5625=1.20283 grams 0.038672 tr oz

 

 

CENTS–each to be of the value of the one hundredth part of a dollar, and to contain eleven penny-weights of copper.

 

17.106912 grams

 

HALF CENTS–each to be of the value of half a cent, and to contain five penny-weights and a half a penny-weight of copper.

 

 

8.553456 grams

 

THESE ARE THE SCIENTIFIC MEASURES OF GOLD.

 

1 OUNCE

20 Pennyweight

31.10 Grams

480 Grains

 

1 PENNYWEIGHT (dwt) 1.56 Grams

24 Grains

 

1 GRAM

15.43 Grains

 

 

THIS IS THE WAY TO COMPUTE ACTUAL VALUE OF THE GOLD YOU HAVE. PLEASE NOTE THAT THE VALUE USED IN THE FOLLOWING COMPUTATIONS ($265) IS ONLY FOR DEMONSTRATION PURPOSES AND IS NOT NECESSARILY THE CURRENT VALUE OF AN OUNCE OF GOLD.

 

GRAINS

Take the value of GOLD and divide it by 480. This will give you the value of a grain.

EXAMPLE—–$265 divided by 480 = .55—-So, each GRAIN of gold you have is worth 55 CENTS.

 

 

PENNYWEIGHT

Take the value of GOLD and divide it by 20. This will give you the value of a Pennyweight (dwt).

EXAMPLE—–$265 divided by 20 = 13.25—–So, each PENNYWEIGHT of gold you have is worth $13.25.

 

 

Copper is traded on three commodity exchanges: The London Metal Exchange (LME), the Commodities Exchange Division of the New York Mercantile Exchange (COMEX/NYMEX), and the Shanghai Metal Exchange (SHME). On the LME, copper is traded in 25-tonne lots and quoted in US dollars per tonne. On COMEX, copper is traded in lots of 25,000 pounds and quoted in US cents per pound. On the SHME, copper is traded in lots of 5 tonnes and is quoted in Renminbi per tonne.

 

 

(a) The Secretary of the Treasury may mint and issue only the

following coins:

(1) a dollar coin that is 1.043 inches in diameter.

(2) a half dollar coin that is 1.205 inches in diameter and

weighs 11.34 grams.

(3) a quarter dollar coin that is 0.955 inch in diameter and

weighs 5.67 grams.

(4) a dime coin that is 0.705 inch in diameter and weighs 2.268

grams.

(5) a 5-cent coin that is 0.835 inch in diameter and weighs 5

grams.

(6) except as provided under subsection (c) of this section, a

one-cent coin that is 0.75 inch in diameter and weighs 3.11

grams.

(7) A fifty dollar gold coin that is 32.7 millimeters in

diameter, weighs 33.931 grams, and contains one troy ounce of

fine gold.

(8) A twenty-five dollar gold coin that is 27.0 millimeters in

diameter, weighs 16.966 grams, and contains one-half troy ounce

of fine gold.

(9) A ten dollar gold coin that is 22.0 millimeters in

diameter, weighs 8.483 grams, and contains one-fourth troy ounce

of fine gold.

(10) A five dollar gold coin that is 16.5 millimeters in

diameter, weighs 3.393 grams, and contains one-tenth troy ounce

of fine gold.

(b) The half dollar, quarter dollar, and dime coins are clad

coins with 3 layers of metal.  The 2 identical outer layers are an

alloy of 75 percent copper and 25 percent nickel.  The inner layer

is copper.  The outer layers are metallurgically bonded to the

inner layer and weigh at least 30 percent of the weight of the

coin.  The dollar coin shall be golden in color, have a distinctive

edge, have tactile and visual features that make the denomination

of the coin readily discernible, be minted and fabricated in the

United States, and have similar metallic, anti-counterfeiting

properties as United States coinage in circulation on the date of

enactment of the United States $1 Coin Act of 1997. The 5-cent coin

is an alloy of 75 percent copper and 25 percent nickel.  In minting

5-cent coins, the Secretary shall use bars that vary not more than

2.5 percent from the percent of nickel required.  Except as

provided under subsection (c) of this section, the one-cent coin is

an alloy of 95 percent copper and 5 percent zinc.  In minting gold

coins, the Secretary shall use alloys that vary not more than 0.1

percent from the percent of gold required.  The specifications for

alloys are by weight.

(c) The Secretary may prescribe the weight and the composition of

copper and zinc in the alloy of the one-cent coin that the

Secretary decides are appropriate when the Secretary decides that a

different weight and alloy of copper and zinc are necessary to

ensure an adequate supply of one-cent coins to meet the needs of

the United States.

(d)(1) United States coins shall have the inscription ”In God We

Trust”. The obverse side of each coin shall have the inscription

”Liberty”. The reverse side of each coin shall have the

inscriptions ”United States of America” and ”E Pluribus Unum”

and a designation of the value of the coin.  The design on the

reverse side of the dollar, half dollar, and quarter dollar is an

eagle.  The Secretary of the Treasury, in consultation with the

Congress, shall select appropriate designs for the obverse and

reverse sides of the dollar coin.  The coins have an inscription of

the year of minting or issuance.  However, to prevent or alleviate

a shortage of a denomination, the Secretary may inscribe coins of

the denomination with the year that was last inscribed on coins of

the denomination.

(2) The Secretary shall prepare the devices, models, hubs, and

dies for coins, emblems, devices, inscriptions, and designs

authorized under this chapter.  The Secretary may adopt and prepare

new designs or models of emblems or devices that are authorized in

the same way as when new coins or devices are authorized.  The

Secretary may change the design or die of a coin only once within

25 years of the first adoption of the design, model, hub, or die

for that coin.  The Secretary may procure services under section

3109 of title 5 in carrying out this paragraph.

(e) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the Secretary

shall mint and issue, in quantities sufficient to meet public

demand, coins which -

(1) are 40.6 millimeters in diameter and weigh 31.103 grams;

(2) contain .999 fine silver;

(3) have a design -

(A) symbolic of Liberty on the obverse side; and

(B) of an eagle on the reverse side;

(4) have inscriptions of the year of minting or issuance, and

the words ”Liberty”, ”In God We Trust”, ”United States of

America”, ”1 Oz. Fine Silver”, ”E Pluribus Unum”, and ”One

Dollar”; and

(5) have reeded edges.

(f) Silver Coins. -

(1) Sale price. – The Secretary shall sell the coins minted

under subsection (e) to the public at a price equal to the market

value of the bullion at the time of sale, plus the cost of

minting, marketing, and distributing such coins (including labor,

materials, dies, use of machinery, and promotional and overhead

expenses).

(2) Bulk sales. – The Secretary shall make bulk sales of the

coins minted under subsection (e) at a reasonable discount.

(3) Numismatic items. – For purposes of section 5132(a)(1) of

this title, all coins minted under subsection (e) shall be

considered to be numismatic items.

(g) For purposes of section 5132(a)(1) of this title, all coins

minted under subsection (e) of this section shall be considered to

be numismatic items.

(h) The coins issued under this title shall be legal tender as

provided in section 5103 of this title.

(i)(1) Notwithstanding section 5111(a)(1) of this title, the

Secretary shall mint and issue the gold coins described in

paragraphs (7), (8), (9), and (10) of subsection (a) of this

section, in quantities sufficient to meet public demand, and such

gold coins shall -

(A) have a design determined by the Secretary, except that the

fifty dollar gold coin shall have -

(i) on the obverse side, a design symbolic of Liberty; and

(ii) on the reverse side, a design representing a family of

eagles, with the male carrying an olive branch and flying above

a nest containing a female eagle and hatchlings;

(B) have inscriptions of the denomination, the weight of the

fine gold content, the year of minting or issuance, and the words

”Liberty”, ”In God We Trust”, ”United States of America”,

and ”E Pluribus Unum”; and

(C) have reeded edges.

(2)(A) The Secretary shall sell the coins minted under this

subsection to the public at a price equal to the market value of

the bullion at the time of sale, plus the cost of minting,

marketing, and distributing such coins (including labor, materials,

dies, use of machinery, and promotional and overhead expenses).

(B) The Secretary shall make bulk sales of the coins minted under

this subsection at a reasonable discount.

(3) For purposes of section 5132(a)(1) of this title, all coins

minted under this subsection shall be considered to be numismatic

items.

(4)(A) Notwithstanding any other provision of law and subject to

subparagraph (B), the Secretary of the Treasury may change the

diameter, weight, or design of any coin minted under this

subsection or the fineness of the gold in the alloy of any such

coin if the Secretary determines that the specific diameter,

weight, design, or fineness of gold which differs from that

otherwise required by law is appropriate for such coin.

(B) The Secretary may not mint any coin with respect to which a

determination has been made by the Secretary under subparagraph (A)

before the end of the 30-day period beginning on the date a notice

of such determination is published in the Federal Register.

(C) The Secretary may continue to mint and issue coins in

accordance with the specifications contained in paragraphs (7),

(8), (9), and (10) of subsection (a) and paragraph (1)(A) of this

subsection at the same time the Secretary in minting and issuing

other bullion and proof gold coins under this subsection in

accordance with such program procedures and coin specifications,

designs, varieties, quantities, denominations, and inscriptions as

the Secretary, in the Secretary’s discretion, may prescribe from

time to time.

(j) General Waiver of Procurement Regulations. -

(1) In general. – Except as provided in paragraph (2), no

provision of law governing procurement or public contracts shall

be applicable to the procurement of goods or services necessary

for minting, marketing, or issuing any coin authorized under

paragraph (7), (8), (9), or (10) of subsection (a) or subsection

(e), including any proof version of any such coin.

(2) Equal employment opportunity. – Paragraph (1) shall not

relieve any person entering into a contract with respect to any

coin referred to in such paragraph from complying with any law

relating to equal employment opportunity.

(k) The Secretary may mint and issue platinum bullion coins and

proof platinum coins in accordance with such specifications,

designs, varieties, quantities, denominations, and inscriptions as

the Secretary, in the Secretary’s discretion, may prescribe from

time to time.

(l) Redesign and Issuance of Quarter Dollar in Commemoration of

Each of the 50 States. -

(1) Redesign beginning in 1999. -

(A) In general. – Notwithstanding the fourth sentence of

subsection (d)(1) and subsection (d)(2), quarter dollar coins

issued during the 10-year period beginning in 1999, shall have

designs on the reverse side selected in accordance with this

subsection which are emblematic of the 50 States.

(B) Transition provision. – Notwithstanding subparagraph (A),

the Secretary may continue to mint and issue quarter dollars in

1999 which bear the design in effect before the redesign

required under this subsection and an inscription of the year

”1998” as required to ensure a smooth transition into the

10-year program under this subsection.

(C) Flexibility with regard to placement of inscriptions. -

Notwithstanding subsection (d)(1), the Secretary may select a

design for quarter dollars issued during the 10-year period

referred to in subparagraph (A) in which -

(i) the inscription described in the second sentence of

subsection (d)(1) appears on the reverse side of any such

quarter dollars; and

(ii) any inscription described in the third sentence of

subsection (d)(1) or the designation of the value of the coin

appears on the obverse side of any such quarter dollars.

(2) Single state designs. – The design on the reverse side of

each quarter dollar issued during the 10-year period referred to

in paragraph (1) shall be emblematic of 1 of the 50 States.

(3) Issuance of coins commemorating 5 states during each of the

10 years. -

(A) In general. – The designs for the quarter dollar coins

issued during each year of the 10-year period referred to in

paragraph (1) shall be emblematic of 5 States selected in the

order in which such States ratified the Constitution of the

United States or were admitted into the Union, as the case may

be.

(B) Number of each of 5 coin designs in each year. – Of the

quarter dollar coins issued during each year of the 10-year

period referred to in paragraph (1), the Secretary of the

Treasury shall prescribe, on the basis of such factors as the

Secretary determines to be appropriate, the number of quarter

dollars which shall be issued with each of the 5 designs

selected for such year.

(4) Selection of design. -

(A) In general. – Each of the 50 designs required under this

subsection for quarter dollars shall be -

(i) selected by the Secretary after consultation with -

(I) the Governor of the State being commemorated, or such

other State officials or group as the State may designate

for such purpose; and

(II) the Commission of Fine Arts; and

(ii) reviewed by the Citizens Commemorative Coin Advisory

Committee.

(B) Selection and approval process. – Designs for quarter

dollars may be submitted in accordance with the design

selection and approval process developed by the Secretary in

the sole discretion of the Secretary.

(C) Participation. – The Secretary may include participation

by State officials, artists from the States, engravers of the

United States Mint, and members of the general public.

(D) Standards. – Because it is important that the Nation’s

coinage and currency bear dignified designs of which the

citizens of the United States can be proud, the Secretary shall

not select any frivolous or inappropriate design for any

quarter dollar minted under this subsection.

(E) Prohibition on certain representations. – No head and

shoulders portrait or bust of any person, living or dead, and

no portrait of a living person may be included in the design of

any quarter dollar under this subsection.

(5) Treatment as numismatic items. – For purposes of sections

5134 and 5136, all coins minted under this subsection shall be

considered to be numismatic items.

(6) Issuance. -

(A) Quality of coins. – The Secretary may mint and issue such

number of quarter dollars of each design selected under

paragraph (4) in uncirculated and proof qualities as the

Secretary determines to be appropriate.

(B) Silver coins. – Notwithstanding subsection (b), the

Secretary may mint and issue such number of quarter dollars of

each design selected under paragraph (4) as the Secretary

determines to be appropriate, with a content of 90 percent

silver and 10 percent copper.

(C) Sources of bullion. – The Secretary shall obtain silver

for minting coins under subparagraph (B) from available

resources, including stockpiles established under the Strategic

and Critical Materials Stock Piling Act.

(7) Application in event of the admission of additional states.

- If any additional State is admitted into the Union before the

end of the 10-year period referred to in paragraph (1), the

Secretary of the Treasury may issue quarter dollar coins, in

accordance with this subsection, with a design which is

emblematic of such State during any 1 year of such 10-year

period, in addition to the quarter dollar coins issued during

such year in accordance with paragraph (3)(A).

(m) Commemorative Coin Program Restrictions. -

(1) Maximum number. – Beginning January 1, 1999, the Secretary

may mint and issue commemorative coins under this section during

any calendar year with respect to not more than 2 commemorative

coin programs.

(2) Mintage levels. -

(A) In general. – Except as provided in subparagraph (B), in

carrying out any commemorative coin program, the Secretary

shall mint -

(i) not more than 750,000 clad half-dollar coins;

(ii) not more than 500,000 silver one-dollar coins; and

(iii) not more than 100,000 gold five-dollar or ten-dollar

coins.

(B) Exception. – If the Secretary determines, based on

independent, market-based research conducted by a designated

recipient organization of a commemorative coin program, that

the mintage levels described in subparagraph (A) are not

adequate to meet public demand for that commemorative coin, the

Secretary may waive one or more of the requirements of

subparagraph (A) with respect to that commemorative coin

program.

(C) Designated recipient organization defined. – For purposes

of this paragraph, the term ”designated recipient

organization” means any organization designated, under any

provision of law, as the recipient of any surcharge imposed on

the sale of any numismatic item.

 

 

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Metric Conversion

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Common Acids and Bases – Information Table

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The remake of Prepper Living

January 31st, 2014 No comments

We are rebuilding Prepper Living.

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Show 000

January 31st, 2014 No comments

Intro Podcast to set up iTunes

 

 

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